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petetherock

An Audiophile's Mid Century Home

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MK plugs are from the road next to Kitchener Rd.

XZQT only brought back in 5, it's a Singapore specific unit. Ask for Hidayat at the Pandan Cresent branch and tell him Peter sent you...

 

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Join 46,923 satisfied homeowners who used renotalk quotation service to find interior designers. Get an estimated quotation

Kotoku fan

IMG_3055.jpg

Height speakers

IMG_3044.jpg

Suspended from the top cabinet, which uses hydraulic struts, just like a hatchback:

IMG_3042.jpg car.

Feature wall, shown with lighting at the bottom, which allows the back of the console to be illuminated.

IMG_3054.jpg

 

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I am having some trouble getting the cove light to be even, i.e. there are some places where the light is "fuller" and arcs out more, and some spots where it is dimmer?

Is that normal?

I am using T5 lights.

Thanks

 

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As posted ph5 lamp is from the balestier shop at 341... Look for Gerald. Should be under 350 esp if you order more.

They have it in grey and white.

Edited by petetherock
 

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As for Studio 1961, I like their service, you just need to know exactly what you want.

Their prices are good, and they will source for the item.

The caveat is that you don't have anything to view, and if there are variations in color, size etc, you won't be able to check it out.

Eg, their Hans Wegner table is about 25% smaller than the real ones, so you need to confirm that this suits your needs.

 

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Working with small space

As our homes in Singapore shrink, and our government tells us we still have enough space (ha!), we face the prospects of having to put up with smaller interiors and changing our expectations of how we decorate or furnish our homes.

Our eyes can be bigger than our living rooms, and we can run the risk of turning our new homes into a congested, untidy storeroom in our haste and enthusiasm to get all those cool and pretty pieces of furniture for our homes.

So here are some points that I garnered during my own hunt:

- measure your home properly

This means more than merely taking out the tape and recording the dimensions. That's important to get right, but also simulate what you will place inside. For example, the width of my dining hall is about 3m, but when I placed a cardboard piece which represented the size of my table (130 by 85cm), it filled up this space amply. Throw in some chairs and the place starts to look very cramped.

- ensure that there is flow and moving space

Like what I mentioned above, you need room to move about, and you can't buy a bed which fits your bedroom dimensions exactly, throw in a cupboard and expect room to move. Instead, a rule of thumb is that you need 70-90cm of space to walk around, and each chair at the dining table will take up another 50cm of space.

You also need space to walk past the table, or simply to avoid letting the whole place look too small.

- get the essential pieces to start off

Most homes will need a dining table, some sofa/lounge chairs etc but don't pack everything into that Ikea van so you save on delivery charges. Leave some room, re-assess and then go for another round of shopping. It's fun, and you can change the theme, the whole look if the first round didn't really suit you.

- get those extras later

For little knick knacks, wait; settle the big pieces of furniture, the static items like the kitchen etc, then aim for the paintings, mirrors, or wall decor. That way, you can have an idea of how much space you have first.

- Colors

Lighter colors will make a smaller home look larger

Mirrors work too, but be careful not to have too many things on the wall.

You can have one dark colored wall, just be careful not to overdo it.

- measure that sofa

Again like the dining table, some two seater sofas are really huge, even though the actual sitting space is limited to two.

Slimmer arm pieces, or using a more streamlined design can help. Cushy sofas, and large leg extensions may not suit the new "mickey mouse" breed of homes.

Ultimately, you just need a little attention to detail to get the proportions right.

 

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Working with small space

As our homes in Singapore shrink, and our government tells us we still have enough space (ha!), we face the prospects of having to put up with smaller interiors and changing our expectations of how we decorate or furnish our homes.

Our eyes can be bigger than our living rooms, and we can run the risk of turning our new homes into a congested, untidy storeroom in our haste and enthusiasm to get all those cool and pretty pieces of furniture for our homes.

So here are some points that I garnered during my own hunt:

- measure your home properly

This means more than merely taking out the tape and recording the dimensions. That's important to get right, but also simulate what you will place inside. For example, the width of my dining hall is about 3m, but when I placed a cardboard piece which represented the size of my table (130 by 85cm), it filled up this space amply. Throw in some chairs and the place starts to look very cramped.

- ensure that there is flow and moving space

Like what I mentioned above, you need room to move about, and you can't buy a bed which fits your bedroom dimensions exactly, throw in a cupboard and expect room to move. Instead, a rule of thumb is that you need 70-90cm of space to walk around, and each chair at the dining table will take up another 50cm of space.

You also need space to walk past the table, or simply to avoid letting the whole place look too small.

- get the essential pieces to start off

Most homes will need a dining table, some sofa/lounge chairs etc but don't pack everything into that Ikea van so you save on delivery charges. Leave some room, re-assess and then go for another round of shopping. It's fun, and you can change the theme, the whole look if the first round didn't really suit you.

- get those extras later

For little knick knacks, wait; settle the big pieces of furniture, the static items like the kitchen etc, then aim for the paintings, mirrors, or wall decor. That way, you can have an idea of how much space you have first.

- Colors

Lighter colors will make a smaller home look larger

Mirrors work too, but be careful not to have too many things on the wall.

You can have one dark colored wall, just be careful not to overdo it.

- measure that sofa

Again like the dining table, some two seater sofas are really huge, even though the actual sitting space is limited to two.

Slimmer arm pieces, or using a more streamlined design can help. Cushy sofas, and large leg extensions may not suit the new "mickey mouse" breed of homes.

Ultimately, you just need a little attention to detail to get the proportions right.

great advice! i agree, cannot buy without measuring in advance.

 

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MK plugs are from the road next to Kitchener Rd.

As mentioned, before, next to Kitchener Road... Maude Road. Cannot remember the name of the shop. It's a hardware / electrical shop.

Should not be more than $30, depending on the number you buy...

Edited by petetherock
 

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As for Studio 1961, I like their service, you just need to know exactly what you want.

Their prices are good, and they will source for the item.

The caveat is that you don't have anything to view, and if there are variations in color, size etc, you won't be able to check it out.

Eg, their Hans Wegner table is about 25% smaller than the real ones, so you need to confirm that this suits your needs.

[/quot

Confirm there is no way you can view the funiture from Studio 1961 since they have no show room.?

 

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My contractor sourced it. Should be <$600. Most vendors can sell it, but you should get someone to install it properly.

My electrician from the contractor isn't that great.

 

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Nope... reno in progress.

You should be able to read about it online. Not a lot of negative feedback, but if wind is your main aim, there are cheaper and stronger models.

 

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