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(As mentioned previously, remove all furniture from the area and apply protection to all fixtures.)

To rectify (what we like to see done; there could be variation by the contractor):

1. Remove the epoxy coating entirely using scraper or putty knife. Vacuum all debris.

2. Apply solvent to clean the area and let dry (take note that the solvent could be toxic).

3. Test moisture level of screed floor; normally done by taping a 500mm x 500mm clear plastic sheet to an area, leave overnight and examine the moisture captured after 24 hours. There is also instrument that could measure the moisture level.

4. Apply the correctly prepared epoxy to the dry floor and let to cure for at least 24 hours.

5. Examine the result before accessing the area.

In all rectifications:

- The goal is obviously to redo a process correctly. However, it is very common to have a contractor in to do a rectification but create another problem. Epoxy could be carelessly applied to fixture and furniture, and then would be very difficult to remove; therefore the protection against it (and also dust).

- It is advised that the all stakeholders have a clear understanding of what is to be done and the expected result, with agreement before starting the rectification.

Good luck!

You're awesome! Thank you so much for sharing the valuable information you have. You sound like you know your stuff well, just curious, are you working in this line?

I have shared everything you posted to my contractor. You have certainly helped a lot and i really appreciate it! They have the top layer removed and it's not sticky anymore. Shall do the moisture test tonight.

Just to check, is it necessary to use the solvent? It wasn't mentioned to me by my contractor thus, I have this feeling that it will not be applied. I also noticed that you mentioned correctly prepared epoxy. Do you mean that incorrectly prepared epoxy could be a mixture of epoxy and thinner?

There really isn't much information I can find online. ):

 

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You're awesome! Thank you so much for sharing the valuable information you have. You sound like you know your stuff well, just curious, are you working in this line?

I have shared everything you posted to my contractor. You have certainly helped a lot and i really appreciate it! They have the top layer removed and it's not sticky anymore. Shall do the moisture test tonight.

Just to check, is it necessary to use the solvent? It wasn't mentioned to me by my contractor thus, I have this feeling that it will not be applied. I also noticed that you mentioned correctly prepared epoxy. Do you mean that incorrectly prepared epoxy could be a mixture of epoxy and thinner?

There really isn't much information I can find online. ):

I am glad that they have been helpful. No, I am not in construction but I would buy landed house to redevelop when there is an opportunity and so, would require the knowledge of what a contractor is up to.

The purpose of the solvent is to dissolve and remove the epoxy trapped (minutely) within the surface (pretty much the same purpose of applying make-up removal in cleansing a face). It really depends on how thorough the contractor wants the job to be done, because then the subsequent moisture test is more definitive.

Another approach is to sand the surface.

The epoxy is to be mixed with a hardener in the proportion instructed by the manufacturer. The contractor should know how to mix and apply properly, if not he should consult the firm where he bought the epoxy from.

Good luck!

 

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Our cement screed floor has been very wet and sticky ever since it has been handed to us. About a day or two ago, we had one of the rooms set up as a trial room (so that we can test and monitor for unexpected changes of the floor). The top layer of epoxy was sanded down, it took a whole lot of sandpaper because it was so sticky that it clumps up on the sandpaper, as of now, it is ultra smooth and not sticky at all. Pictures below.

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We shall try Lauer's suggestion to do the moisture test tonight and see how it goes.

Since we had to clear out everything in one of the rooms, I thought I will share the blinds we installed. All pictures were took in the day. It blocks out majority of the sunlight and our house feels much cooler. We love how convenient it is to adjust the brightness of the house (just roll it up slightly), and how clean it looks. We've got a good deal for our blinds, they do curtains too, pm me if you need the contact. I'll be glad to share. :)

Living room: Charcoal

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Bedrooms: Stone

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Master Bedroom: Blackout Grey

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I'll share more pics of the blinds taken at night some other time. :)

Just thinking about the hassle of emptying the house out for the sanding and epoxy is a huge nightmare. After moving all the itsy bitsy stuff, decor stuff and furniture out from one room, my arms ached for 2 days. Cannot imagine moving the rest. :sport-smiley-003:

 

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