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Hob & Hood


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#1 kids2

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:07 AM

Hi,

Any view to share on this particular model of hob/hood.

Hob
Tecno - Mini3 or TZ703 TR
Elba - EH731

Hood
Tecno - K296
Elba - EBCH 101/90-HM

My Kitchen size is probably 5m by 3m. I do cook every
lunch and weekends, but not the deep fry stuff.
There will be a tempered glass door for my kitchen to
retain the smell & smoke.

What is the pro & cons for the Electric Auto Ignition or battery
operated ignition gas burner?

Appreciate if anyone has any other better model to share?

PS: Thanks to everyone who has enlightened my knowledge
of renovation.

Cheers,

    

#2 applefreak

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:53 AM

i'm all for battery operated coz
1. no need extension of wire to socket
2. no need to take up one socket
3. battery can last quite long
only thing is not many uses battery and even less has the battery on top, most are hidden below so leceh to change. mine is on top coz using turbo :D

#3 kids2

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 11:12 AM

i'm all for battery operated coz
1. no need extension of wire to socket
2. no need to take up one socket
3. battery can last quite long
only thing is not many uses battery and even less has the battery on top, most are hidden below so leceh to change. mine is on top coz using turbo :D


Points taken... applefreak. Thanks!

#4 waileong

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 11:22 AM

Electric ignition will cost you more, as you need an extra high voltage power point, you'll make the electrician happy.

#5 kids2

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:51 PM

Electric ignition will cost you more, as you need an extra high voltage power point, you'll make the electrician happy.


ok pointed taken again. Look like Battery ignition is much better than.

Now, it will be more of the reliability of the Hob & Hood. I'm quite towards
Tecno (allow internal frame for boiling soup) but not sure if anyone has
any good recommendation for other brands.

Looking forward to hear your views.

#6 gendon

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:15 PM

Hi kids2,

I'm using Turbo for both my hob and hood, so far so good.
Turbo chimney hood C940L/90FLPSS
- extraction rate 900m3/hr
- two halogen lamps
- 3-speed fan

Turbo Built-in Gas Hob T8319RSSV (LPG type) with safety valve
- using one AA battery ignition
- 3-ring burner

What I learnt when shopping for hobs & hoods is that need to inform salesperson if you're using LPG or CityGas. As for the hood, you need to take note if there's a beam on the wall that you intend to install the hood, or else have to cut off the top partially but must be above the ventilation holes/slots.

Prior to getting a hob of your choice, u need to plan ahead on things such as:
- battery or electronic ignition? If using battery ignition, where is the battery holder located: on hob surface or under it, and what is the battery size to be used? If using electronic, consider abt the electrical wirings & trunkings that need to run from nearest power point to the hob.
- For electronic ignition hobs, what are your contingency plans in the event of power failure? And what is the wattage?
- how much counter space available in terms of width of hob chosen,
- gas, electric or induction burners? How many burners that you think u will need?
- whether you'll be choosing CityGas or LPG cyclinder,
- If using LPG, how willing are you not to have a suspended bottom cabinets? Do you have enough base cabinet space to put one or even two LPG cylinders?
- If using CityGas, how willing are you that the layout of the gas pipes are to be determined by the relevant authorities?
- stainless steel or glass surface hobs? What is your cleaning/maintenance style like? Can glass surface hobs take the gross weight of heavy pots & pans?
- types of trivets such as whether seamless or separate, cast iron or enamel-coated ones?,
- which is more comfortable for you: knobs at the side or in front side of the hob?
- can the burner caps be easily removed for cleaning?
- are the burner bases fully sealed contain spillage & to protect hob's interior?
- does the gas safety valve fulfill your kitchen safety requirements?
- what is your level of expectation in terms of cleaning/maintenance of hobs & hoods?
- would you like to have a hob as a one single piece or several separate pieces?

So, the choices are yours to make that suit your own needs & lifestyle. And I'm sure once u know what u want, looking for a hob is much easier :sport-smiley-004:

Cheers!

Edited by gendon, 30 July 2007 - 02:21 PM.


#7 raincole

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:17 PM

Inner flame, there are a few brands using. But if anyone happens to find 1 with safety valve, please let me know. Currently, I'm using Fuijoh, but the sad thing, it is without the safety valve. The model which I wanted originally has this feature.

#8 applefreak

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:23 PM

paiseh, what is inner flame? :sport-smiley-004:

hi gendon, very detailed explanation :rolleyes:
sure kids2 will be able to find a hood/hob suitable :rolleyes:

#9 kids2

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:28 PM

Hi kids2,

I'm using Turbo for both my hob and hood.
Turbo chimney hood C940L/90FLPSS
- extraction rate 900m3/hr
- two halogen lamps
- 3-speed fan

Turbo Built-in Gas Hob T8319RSSV (LPG type)
- using one AA battery ignition
- 3-ring burner

What I learnt when shopping for hobs & hoods is that need to inform salesperson if you're using LPG or CityGas. As for the hood, you need to take note if there's a beam on the wall that you intend to install the hood, or else have to cut off the top partially but must be above the ventilation holes/slots.

Prior to getting a hob of your choice, u need to plan ahead on things such as:
- battery or electronic ignition? If using battery ignition, where is the battery holder located: on hob surface or under it, and what is the battery size to be used? If using electronic, consider abt the electrical wirings & trunkings that need to run from nearest power point to the hob.
==>> BATTERY IGNITION


- For electronic ignition hobs, what are your contingency plans in the event of power failure? And what is the wattage?
==>> NOT APPLICABLE


- how much counter space available in terms of width of hob chosen,
==>> NOT MUCH, LOOKING TO HAVE FRIDGE, SINK & STOVE. NOT SURE IF IT'S FEASIBLE, WILL
CONFIRM WITH MY ID AGAIN.


- gas, electric or induction burners? How many burners that you think u will need?
==>> HOPEFULLY 3, ONE ON EACH SIDE AND THEN ONE ON THE CENTRE.


- whether you'll be choosing CityGas or LPG cyclinder,
==>> CITYGAS


- If using LPG, how willing are you not to have a suspended bottom cabinets? Do you have enough base cabinet space to put one or even two LPG cylinders?
==>> NOT APPLICABLE


- If using CityGas, how willing are you that the layout of the gas pipes are to be determined by the relevant authorities?
==>> NOT MUCH CONCERN ABT THAT


- stainless steel or glass surface hobs? What is your cleaning/maintenance style like? Can glass surface hobs take the gross weight of heavy pots & pans?
==>> STAINLESS STEEL. HAVE A MAID AT HOME TO DO THE CLEANING AFTER EVERY MEAL. BUT WOULD ==>>LIKE TO HAVE SOMETHING EASY TO MAINTAIN IN ANY EVENT, I NEED TO RENT OUT THE APARTMENT.
==>>(CAN'T EXPECT EVERYONE TO BE A CLEAN FREAK LIKE ME).


- types of trivets such as whether seamless or separate, cast iron or enamel-coated ones?,
==>> CAN U EXPLAIN MORE ON THIS POINT PLS?


- which is more comfortable for you: knobs at the side or in front side of the hob?
==>> NO PREFERNCE

- can the burner caps be easily removed for cleaning?
==>> YES


- are the burner bases fully sealed contain spillage & to protect hob's interior?
==>> BASED ON YOUR EXPERIENCE, IS IT REALLY THAT IMPORTANT? I ONLY FOUND OUT
==>> ABT THIS POINT RECENTLY.

- does the gas safety valve fulfill your kitchen safety requirements?
==>> HOW DO YOU TELL?

- what is your level of expectation in terms of cleaning/maintenance of hobs & hoods?
==>> EASY

- would you like to have a hob as a one single piece or several separate pieces?
==>> ONE SINGLE PIECE


So, the choices are yours to make that suit your own needs & lifestyle. And I'm sure once u know what u want, looking for a hob is much easier :rolleyes:

Cheers!



Hi Gendon,

Thanks for the very detailed hob/hood information.
It has definitely been very helpful.

PLEASE SEE MY COMMENTS.

:sport-smiley-004:

#10 gendon

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:36 PM

Inner flame, there are a few brands using. But if anyone happens to find 1 with safety valve, please let me know. Currently, I'm using Fuijoh, but the sad thing, it is without the safety valve. The model which I wanted originally has this feature.


Hi raincole :sport-smiley-004:

When I bought my Turbo hob, I paid extra for the safety valve bcos I feel there is a need to, when my kitchen can get very windy from the service balcony. It's a useful feature when the wind can blow out the flame w/o u realising it, and also for forgetful people (like me when I was pregnant several years ago, I totally forgot abt the pasta sauce that I cooked. Startled from my nap bcos I finally smell something burning!)

Oh ya, btw for my hob, 2 out of the 3 burnings are double-ringed (which means got two flame rings per burner). The smallest burner is single-ringed. The biggest burner is on the right side, nearer to the side and the other two os on the left side of the hob, while the centre part is the landing space.

Edited by gendon, 30 July 2007 - 02:44 PM.


#11 gendon

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 03:23 PM

paiseh, what is inner flame? :sport-smiley-004:

hi gendon, very detailed explanation :)
sure kids2 will be able to find a hood/hob suitable :yamseng:


The inner flame referes to the smallest ring of flame in a double or triple-ring burner. :)

#12 raincole

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 03:35 PM

paiseh, what is inner flame? :sport-smiley-004:

hi gendon, very detailed explanation :)
sure kids2 will be able to find a hood/hob suitable :yamseng:



Inner flame.... if u see most hob, the burner is located on top of the glass/steel. For the inner burner/flame, the burner is act. located below the glass surface, so that the flame will be more concentrate at a spot, less likely to be blown out by wind cos "protected", and therefore faster cooking time.

Hi raincole :D

When I bought my Turbo hob, I paid extra for the safety valve bcos I feel there is a need to, when my kitchen can get very windy from the service balcony. It's a useful feature when the wind can blow out the flame w/o u realising it, and also for forgetful people (like me when I was pregnant several years ago, I totally forgot abt the pasta sauce that I cooked. Startled from my nap bcos I finally smell something burning!)

Oh ya, btw for my hob, 2 out of the 3 burnings are double-ringed (which means got two flame rings per burner). The smallest burner is single-ringed. The biggest burner is on the right side, nearer to the side and the other two os on the left side of the hob, while the centre part is the landing space.



I know but the feature is not available with this model. I also wanted safety valve cos I'm also forgetful and I also want to do other stuffs, while cooking to better manage my time with all my tasks. :)

Edited by raincole, 30 July 2007 - 03:33 PM.


#13 gendon

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 04:32 PM

Hi Gendon,

Thanks for the very detailed hob/hood information.
It has definitely been very helpful.

PLEASE SEE MY COMMENTS.

:sport-smiley-004:


Hi kids2, the blue text is my explanation as follows:

Prior to getting a hob of your choice, u need to plan ahead on things such as:
- battery or electronic ignition? If using battery ignition, where is the battery holder located: on hob surface or under it, and what is the battery size to be used? If using electronic, consider abt the electrical wirings & trunkings that need to run from nearest power point to the hob.
==>> BATTERY IGNITION


- For electronic ignition hobs, what are your contingency plans in the event of power failure? And what is the wattage?
==>> NOT APPLICABLE


- how much counter space available in terms of width of hob chosen,
==>> NOT MUCH, LOOKING TO HAVE FRIDGE, SINK & STOVE. NOT SURE IF IT'S FEASIBLE, WILL
CONFIRM WITH MY ID AGAIN.

Yup, better confirm with your ID bcos he/she need the final measurements from u, of the 3 main appliances as above (width x depth x height plus side and back allowance for fridge), prior to finalised carpentry measurements. U also need to know your basic Work Triangle (total distance from stove, sink and fridge when in the kitchen) in your kitchen layout and discuss with your ID in great detail about your cooking habits, storage requirements, where u like to eat and the correct layout.


- gas, electric or induction burners? How many burners that you think u will need?
==>> HOPEFULLY 3, ONE ON EACH SIDE AND THEN ONE ON THE CENTRE.

I assume the one in the centre is the one nearer to the kitchen wall? Depending on your cooking habits, the size of your pots and pans matters too. If you got too big a pot/pan placed in the centre hob, make sure that the potís edge doesnít touch or too near to the wall.

- whether you'll be choosing CityGas or LPG cyclinder,
==>> CITYGAS


- If using LPG, how willing are you not to have a suspended bottom cabinets? Do you have enough base cabinet space to put one or even two LPG cylinders?
==>> NOT APPLICABLE


- If using CityGas, how willing are you that the layout of the gas pipes are to be determined by the relevant authorities?
==>> NOT MUCH CONCERN ABT THAT


- stainless steel or glass surface hobs? What is your cleaning/maintenance style like? Can glass surface hobs take the gross weight of heavy pots & pans?
==>> STAINLESS STEEL. HAVE A MAID AT HOME TO DO THE CLEANING AFTER EVERY MEAL. BUT WOULD ==>>LIKE TO HAVE SOMETHING EASY TO MAINTAIN IN ANY EVENT, I NEED TO RENT OUT THE APARTMENT.
==>>(CAN'T EXPECT EVERYONE TO BE A CLEAN FREAK LIKE ME).

Hee hee! Lucky you!

- types of trivets such as whether seamless or separate, cast iron or enamel-coated ones?,
==>> CAN U EXPLAIN MORE ON THIS POINT PLS?
The trivets are the metal parts that your pots/pans sit on when you cook. Seamless is when throughout the hob, the trivet is one piece (usually very heavy depending on what type of metal). You can usually see seamless trivets like SMEG freestanding range cooktops or those restaurant type of cast-iron seamless trivets where the chefs just slide the pots/pan from one burner to another. Separate is when one or two burners share one trivet piece. Cast iron trivets tend to be heavy, more durable and thicker while enamel-coated ones are the types that we commonly see in local kitchens, easier to lift, clean and scrape off burnt food stuck on it.

- which is more comfortable for you: knobs at the side or in front side of the hob?
==>> NO PREFERNCE

- can the burner caps be easily removed for cleaning?
==>> YES
When browsing/buying hobs, u need to ask the salesperson to demonstrate to you how it is removed and put back, and ask questions abt cleaning and maintenance.

- are the burner bases fully sealed contain spillage & to protect hob's interior?
==>> BASED ON YOUR EXPERIENCE, IS IT REALLY THAT IMPORTANT? I ONLY FOUND OUT
==>> ABT THIS POINT RECENTLY.
When u lift the burner cap, you should see that the circle cut is slightly raised in such a way that should spillage occur, it will just flow back to the flat surface of the hob and not into the circle cut. If not, under the hob sure got major cleaning to do and for fire safety reasons too.

- does the gas safety valve fulfill your kitchen safety requirements?
==>> HOW DO YOU TELL?
U need to check if your kitchen tends to be windy, or if itís near the windows. One useful feature of the safety valve (or also known as flame failure device), is that if the flame is accidentally extinguished, e.g. by a draught or wind, then the gas supply automatically cuts off.

- what is your level of expectation in terms of cleaning/maintenance of hobs & hoods?
==>> EASY

- would you like to have a hob as a one single piece or several separate pieces?
==>> ONE SINGLE PIECE


FYI:

Hoods (also known as extractor fans) in Sípore domestic kitchens are usually recirculating type, where majority live in a block of flats without an accessible external wall. Stale air is drawn in and purified using grease and charcoal filters, before re-entering the kitchen.

Position the hood carefully above your hob bcos if:
- too close, the steam may escape around the sides
- too far away, the steam may disperse before it reaches it.

For gas hobs, the minimum distance is around 65cm (from hob to hood bottom), whereas for electric hobs, reduce the minimum distance to 50-55cm.

To choose a hood, work out the volume of the kitchen to be ventilated by multiplying length x width x height, for a suitable hood extraction rate (cubic metre per hour). A gd ventilation system will change the air in the room/area 10 times per hour, so multiply this figure by 10, to give the minimum extraction rate required for your kitchen. And donít forget to ask abt noise levels and try to aim around 55-60 decibels as a benchmark.


Abt power points in the kitchen: always ensure that the power point is not within the width of the stove or the sink, it should outside the width of these two items for safety reasons. Steam/grease from cooking at the stove, as well as water splashes from washing at the sink, can cause dirt/grease build-up inside the powerpoints, may cause power short-circuit and unwanted fires to happen.

The distance between each work zone (stove, fridge, sink zones) should be at least 90cm. Too far, you waste energy moving from one end to the other. Too close, working in the kitchen becomes uncomfortable and cramped. The most important work space in the kitchen actually lies between the sink and the stove, bcos that's where the most activity takes place usually.

Hope that helps! :yamseng:

Edited by gendon, 30 July 2007 - 04:48 PM.


#14 kids2

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 04:53 PM

Hi kids2, the blue text is my explanation as follows:

Prior to getting a hob of your choice, u need to plan ahead on things such as:
- battery or electronic ignition? If using battery ignition, where is the battery holder located: on hob surface or under it, and what is the battery size to be used? If using electronic, consider abt the electrical wirings & trunkings that need to run from nearest power point to the hob.
==>> BATTERY IGNITION
- For electronic ignition hobs, what are your contingency plans in the event of power failure? And what is the wattage?
==>> NOT APPLICABLE
- how much counter space available in terms of width of hob chosen,
==>> NOT MUCH, LOOKING TO HAVE FRIDGE, SINK & STOVE. NOT SURE IF IT'S FEASIBLE, WILL
CONFIRM WITH MY ID AGAIN.

Yup, better confirm with your ID bcos he/she need the final measurements from u, of the 3 main appliances as above (width x depth x height plus side and back allowance for fridge), prior to finalised carpentry measurements. U also need to know your basic Work Triangle (total distance from stove, sink and fridge when in the kitchen) in your kitchen layout and discuss with your ID in great detail about your cooking habits, storage requirements, where u like to eat and the correct layout.
- gas, electric or induction burners? How many burners that you think u will need?
==>> HOPEFULLY 3, ONE ON EACH SIDE AND THEN ONE ON THE CENTRE.

I assume the one in the centre is the one nearer to the kitchen wall? Depending on your cooking habits, the size of your pots and pans matters too. If you got too big a pot/pan placed in the centre hob, make sure that the potís edge doesnít touch or too near to the wall.

- whether you'll be choosing CityGas or LPG cyclinder,
==>> CITYGAS
- If using LPG, how willing are you not to have a suspended bottom cabinets? Do you have enough base cabinet space to put one or even two LPG cylinders?
==>> NOT APPLICABLE
- If using CityGas, how willing are you that the layout of the gas pipes are to be determined by the relevant authorities?
==>> NOT MUCH CONCERN ABT THAT
- stainless steel or glass surface hobs? What is your cleaning/maintenance style like? Can glass surface hobs take the gross weight of heavy pots & pans?
==>> STAINLESS STEEL. HAVE A MAID AT HOME TO DO THE CLEANING AFTER EVERY MEAL. BUT WOULD ==>>LIKE TO HAVE SOMETHING EASY TO MAINTAIN IN ANY EVENT, I NEED TO RENT OUT THE APARTMENT.
==>>(CAN'T EXPECT EVERYONE TO BE A CLEAN FREAK LIKE ME).

Hee hee! Lucky you!

- types of trivets such as whether seamless or separate, cast iron or enamel-coated ones?,
==>> CAN U EXPLAIN MORE ON THIS POINT PLS?
The trivets are the metal parts that your pots/pans sit on when you cook. Seamless is when throughout the hob, the trivet is one piece (usually very heavy depending on what type of metal). You can usually see seamless trivets like SMEG freestanding range cooktops or those restaurant type of cast-iron seamless trivets where the chefs just slide the pots/pan from one burner to another. Separate is when one or two burners share one trivet piece. Cast iron trivets tend to be heavy, more durable and thicker while enamel-coated ones are the types that we commonly see in local kitchens, easier to lift, clean and scrape off burnt food stuck on it.

- which is more comfortable for you: knobs at the side or in front side of the hob?
==>> NO PREFERNCE

- can the burner caps be easily removed for cleaning?
==>> YES
When browsing/buying hobs, u need to ask the salesperson to demonstrate to you how it is removed and put back, and ask questions abt cleaning and maintenance.

- are the burner bases fully sealed contain spillage & to protect hob's interior?
==>> BASED ON YOUR EXPERIENCE, IS IT REALLY THAT IMPORTANT? I ONLY FOUND OUT
==>> ABT THIS POINT RECENTLY.
When u lift the burner cap, you should see that the circle cut is slightly raised in such a way that should spillage occur, it will just flow back to the flat surface of the hob and not into the circle cut. If not, under the hob sure got major cleaning to do and for fire safety reasons too.

- does the gas safety valve fulfill your kitchen safety requirements?
==>> HOW DO YOU TELL?
U need to check if your kitchen tends to be windy, or if itís near the windows. One useful feature of the safety valve (or also known as flame failure device), is that if the flame is accidentally extinguished, e.g. by a draught or wind, then the gas supply automatically cuts off.

- what is your level of expectation in terms of cleaning/maintenance of hobs & hoods?
==>> EASY

- would you like to have a hob as a one single piece or several separate pieces?
==>> ONE SINGLE PIECE
FYI:

Hoods (also known as extractor fans) in Sípore domestic kitchens are usually recirculating type, where majority live in a block of flats without an accessible external wall. Stale air is drawn in and purified using grease and charcoal filters, before re-entering the kitchen.

Position the hood carefully above your hob bcos if:
- too close, the steam may escape around the sides
- too far away, the steam may disperse before it reaches it.

For gas hobs, the minimum distance is around 65cm (from hob to hood bottom), whereas for electric hobs, reduce the minimum distance to 50-55cm.

To choose a hood, work out the volume of the kitchen to be ventilated by multiplying length x width x height, for a suitable hood extraction rate (cubic metre per hour). A gd ventilation system will change the air in the room/area 10 times per hour, so multiply this figure by 10, to give the minimum extraction rate required for your kitchen. And donít forget to ask abt noise levels and try to aim around 55-60 decibels as a benchmark.


Abt power points in the kitchen: always ensure that the power point is not within the width of the stove or the sink, it should outside the width of these two items for safety reasons. Steam/grease from cooking at the stove, as well as water splashes from washing at the sink, can cause dirt/grease build-up inside the powerpoints, may cause power short-circuit and unwanted fires to happen.

The distance between each work zone (stove, fridge, sink zones) should be at least 90cm. Too far, you waste energy moving from one end to the other. Too close, working in the kitchen becomes uncomfortable and cramped. The most important work space in the kitchen actually lies between the sink and the stove, bcos that's where the most activity takes place usually.

Hope that helps! :yamseng:


HI GENDON,

YOU ARE GOOD! :good:
MIND IF I ASK YOU WHAT IS YOUR OCCPUATION?
OR SHOULD I SAY THAT YOU DEFINITELY HAS DONE YOUR HOMEWORK BEFORE
MAKING YOUR PURCHASE OF HOB/HOOD.

THANKS AGAIN.

#15 gendon

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 05:22 PM

Hi kids2

Hee hee, thanks ::paisey:: .....no lah.....I'm just a simple Stay-At-Home-Mom living with hubby & our 3yr old tot, am also a short-order cook who cooks simple meals like pastas and soups (sorry, I dunno how to cook rendang or other typical Malay dishes) :D

Glad to share with you the knowledge I gained thru' lots of research & reading, the reno process, with my ID, and grilling the poor salespeople of their product knowledge when shopping for home appliances, furnitures and whatnots. :good:

Btw, I used to work in billing & cs section in a green telco, worked in retail, sales in a telco where the founder is a UK tycoon, also as was CSO in a stat board where the main office is at robinson road. :yamseng:

And I ever kena 'suan' before, for being too meticulous & detail-oriented. Haiizzzz.....

Cheers!

Edited by gendon, 30 July 2007 - 05:26 PM.


#16 hello88

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:24 AM

paiseh, what is inner flame? :dancingqueen:


Rinnai Inner Flame

Edited by hello88, 31 July 2007 - 01:25 AM.


#17 raincole

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 09:44 AM

Rinnai Inner Flame


:sport-smiley-004: !!

#18 lookingout

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 12:11 AM

heard Mayer is having their annual warehouse sales this weekend, 21st - 23rd Aug, any one interested to take a look at what they are to offer? they sell hobs, hoods ovens as well. looking forward to it.

#19 SmartFool

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 02:14 PM

is this at the same venue as before?
venue: mayer marketing JEL centre 11 Changi North Way

thnaks

Edited by SmartFool, 22 August 2008 - 02:16 PM.


#20 LGG

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 09:20 PM

Is Fujioh a good hob and hood?

#21 swift

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 04:01 PM


Me juz returned from a shop along balestier.

I really felt so ignorant. I'm surprised that there are so many brands in the market.
Just to name a few (as i've their catalogue with me but all looks the same to me)

ELLANE, HOBZ, TECHNO GAS, TURBO, UNO

Can someone please advise?
Which is the 'value for money', in other words, cheap and good?
For the oven, is it really necessary to get those with built in oven??

#22 jaskel

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 10:24 PM

QUOTE (swift @ Apr 8 2009, 04:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Me juz returned from a shop along balestier.

I really felt so ignorant. I'm surprised that there are so many brands in the market.
Just to name a few (as i've their catalogue with me but all looks the same to me)

ELLANE, HOBZ, TECHNO GAS, TURBO, UNO

Can someone please advise?
Which is the 'value for money', in other words, cheap and good?
For the oven, is it really necessary to get those with built in oven??


Techno gas hob, no bad...used it on my previous flat for 6yrs no problem. Presently installing Brandt induction and convention hobs for my new house.

#23 enivi

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 11:16 PM

QUOTE (jaskel @ Apr 8 2009, 10:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Techno gas hob, no bad...used it on my previous flat for 6yrs no problem. Presently installing Brandt induction and convention hobs for my new house.


How much did u pay for your induction cooker, how many cooker is there? So does induction use a lot of electricity?

#24 happypie

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 11:30 AM

Hi Gendon, thanks v much for sharing ur knowledge! I gonna start my reno soon and I'm totally clueless as to what cooker, hob etc to buy and stuff to note.. I'm jotted down ur pointers... Guess speaking from experience really helps alot for us newbies.. good.gif

Cheers smile.gif

#25 lynmin

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 02:17 PM

Just bought the set of Hobz, hopefully it is good. The saleslady says the 1000W can absorb the "smoke" to reduce oiliness and smell in the house. Paid a good price for S$550.

#26 CharlizeOng

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 11:26 PM

Brand NEW Fujioh NL-900 Hood for sale!!! $700!!

The new Fujioh NL-900 cooker hood showcases designer looks. Behind its pleasing lines, a revolutionary Rectifier Panel and a silently powerful Sirocco fan work together to draw in cooking fumes from all directions. Tiny oil vapors are then trapped by a removable Oil Filter. As a result, your kitchen is fumes-free and grease-free. The energy saving Fujioh NL-900 is a stylish performer that compliments your modern home and lifestyle.

Specifications:
Model: NL-900R
Type: Recycling
Dimensions: W899mm x D640mm x H685mm
Noise level: High 55db, Mid 50db, Low 44db
Power consumption: High 105W, Mid 75W, Low 55W
Rated voltage: 230V
Fan: Sirocco
Weight: 25kg
Color: Stainless steel
Warranty: 3 years from end Jun 2011
Comes with free optional duct cover NLD 300R, 885mm - 985mm extension worth $110.

Selling because it does not fit into our kitchen cabinet. Self-collection. Hood has not been installed yet and still comes with the original box. More information and pictures available at: http://www.fujioh.com.sg/

Edited by CharlizeOng, 17 July 2011 - 11:28 PM.


#27 pamsie

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 11:49 AM

Choosing a good reliable hood and hob can be difficult because there are so so so many to choose from the market nowadays.

I would like to share with everyone here a particular brand, FOTILE. It is big here in KL and some other countries too.

Ive posted up some videos of our lab test and hope you guys enjoy watching it :)

This particular model has an iron curtain feature which forms a barrier from letting smoke/fumes escape, thus allowing maximum efficient suction of cooking fumes. Look at the first 20 seconds of the video ( iron curtain not switched on ) and compare it with when the iron curtain is switched on. U'll be amazed :)



#28 KittyJems

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 12:43 PM

How is the Teka brand of Hob and Hood? Is this brand good? Cos my kitchen ID recommend me to use this. Really appreciate all feedbacks. Thanks. :help:

#29 musicbox

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 03:43 PM

My review on Rinnai:
http://mylittlecasa....ai-hood-rh.html




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