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kennylow76

GOLDEN RATIO DESIGN

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example:

If scaling everything uniformly, then the golden ratio is maintained. 
If scaling a square or circle, scale it using the the ratio 1.618 for a bigger square or circle, or 0.618 for a smaller circle.

If you pick any circle in the grid I used, it will be 1.618 x bigger than the smaller circle within it, and 0.618 x smaller than the next bigger circle. This grid was constructed geometrically by drawing circles and pentagons. The golden ratio that can be found throughout this grid and is a consequence of working geometrically.

What you can do is create a square or a circle, e.g., 2400 px by 2400 px (or any size you like), then make as many scaled copies as you like by multiplying each copy's height and width by 0.168 Then you will have a set of shapes from large to small to work with.

The thing to remember about using the golden ratio is that it's a proportional relationship that we are dealing with across height and width (and depth if working in 3D), not an arithmetic relationship. Hence, standard units of measure, e.g., mm, pixels, etc are of little relevance. Having said that, we still have the constraint of working with pixels when it comes to small icons, especially on low resolution screens, but that's only because pixels are large relative to the size of the finished design.

 

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On ‎11‎/‎4‎/‎2017 at 4:21 PM, kennylow76 said:

example:

If scaling everything uniformly, then the golden ratio is maintained. 
If scaling a square or circle, scale it using the the ratio 1.618 for a bigger square or circle, or 0.618 for a smaller circle.

If you pick any circle in the grid I used, it will be 1.618 x bigger than the smaller circle within it, and 0.618 x smaller than the next bigger circle. This grid was constructed geometrically by drawing circles and pentagons. The golden ratio that can be found throughout this grid and is a consequence of working geometrically.

What you can do is create a square or a circle, e.g., 2400 px by 2400 px (or any size you like), then make as many scaled copies as you like by multiplying each copy's height and width by 0.168 Then you will have a set of shapes from large to small to work with.

The thing to remember about using the golden ratio is that it's a proportional relationship that we are dealing with across height and width (and depth if working in 3D), not an arithmetic relationship. Hence, standard units of measure, e.g., mm, pixels, etc are of little relevance. Having said that, we still have the constraint of working with pixels when it comes to small icons, especially on low resolution screens, but that's only because pixels are large relative to the size of the finished design.

The golden ratio is also called the golden mean or golden section (Latin: sectio aurea).[1][2][3] Other names include extreme and mean ratio,[4]medial section, divine proportion, divine section (Latin: sectio divina), golden proportion, golden cut,[5] and golden number.[6][7][8]

Some twentieth-century artists and architects, including Le Corbusier and Dalí, have proportioned their works to approximate the golden ratio—especially in the form of the golden rectangle, in which the ratio of the longer side to the shorter is the golden ratio—believing this proportion to be aesthetically pleasing. The golden ratio appears in some patterns in nature, including the spiral arrangement of leaves and other plant parts.

Mathematicians since Euclid have studied the properties of the golden ratio, including its appearance in the dimensions of a regular pentagon and in a golden rectangle, which may be cut into a square and a smaller rectangle with the same aspect ratio. The golden ratio has also been used to analyze the proportions of natural objects as well as man-made systems such as financial markets, in some cases based on dubious fits to data.[9]

 

from wiki

 

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