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gakuseisean

Living Room Inspiration

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Thanks for the inspirations! Like to seek some opinions here. Planning to get a white TV console. Notice in many magazines these days that people like to use glossy white instead of matt. But my designer recommends matt cos of the reflection of light when watching TV. Any feedback?

Thanks!

 

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Hi,

Can anyone suggest me if i have a black and white theme kitchen, how should i should blend it with some woodgrain theme in the living room?

Thanks!

Cheers:) Emobebe

 

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Thanks for the inspirations! Like to seek some opinions here. Planning to get a white TV console. Notice in many magazines these days that people like to use glossy white instead of matt. But my designer recommends matt cos of the reflection of light when watching TV. Any feedback?

Thanks!

Hmm personally I think that with television screens being so bright today, being distracted by the glossy surface of a tv console shouldn't be too big an issue. But ultimately that depends on how glossy the surface is - if it is slightly glossy then it shouldn't be any problem, but if its excessively glossy, perhaps it might get distracting.

Maybe you should browse the forum and ask those who have installed glossy TV consoles? I for one use a matte wood one at home.

 

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RETRO CHIC

Again, another homage to the mid-century era.

retro_chic.jpg

retrochice.jpg

I didn't mention this in the pictures above, but the lamp is Artemide's Tolomeo Mega floor lamp.

Oh and while the Mid-century era was more defined by the use of teak wood, I think that the use of oak in my design makes the room feel a little lighter.

Oh and as for the Fiddle-Fig plant, do note that the plant does require some degree of sunlight to survive.

If you like this design, or would like to know a bit more about how to make such a look work, leave a comment on this link.

Edited by gakuseisean
 

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CLASSICAL SALON

A follow up to my earlier post on creating the backbones of a [neo]-classical home.

I've included two versions of a room here - one with floor-to-ceiling wall pannelling, the other with wallpaper.

Apartment82011-06-1122390600000b.png

Apartment8Wallpaperversion2011-06-1200021200000b.png

ClassicSalon.jpg

In the above lookbook, you'll realise the great thing about doing a classical theme for your home - it's quite flexible; furniture and accessories can come from a myriad of design periods (from the Baroque to Greek Revival), especially since many grand old homes had the luxury of accquiring pieces over a span of time. For this lookbook, most of the pieces lean towards the Greek Revival/Regency look rather than the excessiveness of the Baroque and Rococco period.

I didn't manage to find any local retailers that sell the furniture/accessories featured in the above lookbook (a bulk are taken from Ralph Lauren Home), but if you truly intend to get this look done, do consider having furniture custom made in countries like Indonesia, as its probably quite difficult to get any here at decent prices, either that or they are excessively gaudy.

EDIT:

[Local] Places worth considering in your search for furniture

Pagodahouse, at Tudor Court, Tanglin, for that touch of chinoiserie in your home. (prices are probably high)

Also, below are two pictures for a bit of inspiration.

LX006129.jpg

16_rare_and_refined.jpg

The top one is a little more French rustic than the bottom image, but nevertheless both are quite authentically classical in style (the latter should be a lot more modern though)

What I'm implying with the last statement is that a beautifully designed classic-themed home is not one that is crafted overnight, it takes effort, time and patience, especially in sourcing pieces. All the best to those who are keen to attempt something like that!

If you like this design, or would like to know a bit more about how to make such a look work, leave a comment on this link.

Edited by gakuseisean
 

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INDUSTRIAL BEDROOM

Inspired by the many white-washed brick walls that can be found in the Renotalk Forums lately, I've decided to come up with this lookbook:

Bedroom2011-06-1900483300000b.png

IndustrialBedroom-1.jpg

Do however note that the Eames Hang It All featured in this lookbook isn't available for sale, it is completely sold out - it was a limited edition 2010 release, if you really want this, do give Ebay a try. Also, I know that many people in this forum here are somewhat skeptical of Ikea's quality, but I believe that the headboard should be fine - so long as it is not subject to extremely heavy weights.

The Risom Chair by Knoll is available at Dream Interiors, while reproductions are available at Lush.

If you like this design, or would like to know a bit more about how to make such a look work, leave a comment on this link.

Edited by gakuseisean
 

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Dude you are really awesome! Wish I were as good as putting things together as you.

Will ask for your advice more, especially on furnishings when I start doing up my place.

Keep up the good work :sport-smiley-003:

INDUSTRIAL BEDROOM

Inspired by the many white-washed brick walls that can be found in the Renotalk Forums lately, I've decided to come up with this lookbook:

Bedroom2011-06-1900483300000b.png

IndustrialBedroom-1.jpg

Do however note that the Eames Hang It All featured in this lookbook isn't available for sale, it is completely sold out - it was a limited edition 2010 release, if you really want this, do give Ebay a try. Also, I know that many people in this forum here are somewhat skeptical of Ikea's quality, but I believe that the headboard should be fine - so long as it is not subject to extremely heavy weights.

The Risom Chair by Knoll is available at Dream Interiors, while reproductions are available at Lush.

 

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Dude you are really awesome! Wish I were as good as putting things together as you.

Will ask for your advice more, especially on furnishings when I start doing up my place.

Keep up the good work :sport-smiley-003:

Thanks :) How's your place shaping up so far?

 

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[NEO]-CLASSICAL HOME, PART 1

One theme that many Singaporeans seem to like, but fail to understand how to execute properly is the [neo]Classical one. A common mistake when it comes to execution is firstly, the backbone of the style - the setting itself. So below are some [fundemental] aspects that would help to increase the authenticity of your home's design, should you choose to go with a classical theme.

I'm basing this write-up on my understanding of the neo-classical (i.e. late 18th, early 19th Century) design ethos.

Classic1.jpg

It's somewhat colonial/Greek Revival in style in this render, somewhat simplified, but the basic elements remain the same, and more importantly, the atmosphere is there.

1. Wall Panelling

In the above picture, I've showed a fully-panneled wall, which is common in many formal classical settings. On a fully pannelled wall with two indented regions, the lower indented region is usually slightly less than two-thirds of the wall's height.

An alternative that is less formal, though equally period-appropriate is panelling up to a chair-rail (see below). Basically, its panelled up to about one-thirds of the wall, similar to how it is done with full-height wall panelling. The unpanneled part could either be painted as done in the picture below, or wallpapered.

wainscoting.jpg

2. Cornice & other Ceiling Pieces

Often neglected also is the cornice, perhaps due to its association with older (and arguably less stylish) homes from the 80s. Nevertheless, a cornice is also another key fundemental aspect of a neo-classical home. It should be nothing too exaggerated, but not too over-simplified as well.

An optional but highly-recommended addition is a ceiling medallion. Its a round plaster thingy (see below) meant to decorate the ceiling, and beautify the start of a light fixture.

beamed_sam4.jpg

3. Baseboard

Also really important. Evidently, the people of old had some form of dislike for sharp and abrupt lines (i.e. those of minimalism/modernism), hence the gentle and deliberate progression from ceiling to walls to floors. They tend to be white in classical rooms, but may also be in the same shade as the wood floor, depending on the degree of formality of the room.

4. Floor

In the first picture (the render), I've used a dark parquet. This is common in many modern refurbishments of historical homes, in line with current tastes, but it may not be the most period appropriate. More appropriate would be a mid-brown parquet that is laid in a herringbone or cheveron manner (see below)

2075627408_0ffb8e3126.jpg

In order to soften the look, a carpet was usually placed over the parquet - rugs like Persian carpets or similarly richly decorated ones.

Alternatively, entirely-carpeted floors were common as well, but that is not extremely practical in Singapore, and also it'll probably make your home feel like a hotel room. Marble floors were also uncommon, and were usually reserved for palatial settings.

Also, one final point to note: Most rooms in classical homes tend to be rectangular/square/any other similar permutations in shape, and not L-shaped like most apartments are these days. So subdividing your space into rectangular areas (e.g. a dedicated dining space seperated by an archway/pillars) would add to the authenticity.

As a conclusion to this short write-up, it should be noted that many classical homes complete wall to ceiling panelling, and while half-wall pannels are common, there are exceptions. However the bare minimum would be a good baseboard, (perhaps) a chair rail and also definitely the cornice.

Thanks for the write up..... Just what I have been looking for!

 

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ECLECTIC DINING

EclecticDining2.jpg

EclecticDining2a.jpg

I'm personally not too sure where exactly one can find those Eames table legs, but a good place to try might be Lorgans, where at least, you might be able to find something similar even if its not an authentic (vintage) Eames leg.

As for the industrial lamp, are many variations of these, Ikea has some decent ones as well.

If you like this design, or would like to know a bit more about how to make such a look work, leave a comment on this link.

Edited by gakuseisean
 

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Hey gakuseisean, have you any idea where I can find the subway tiles in Singapore?

You can get it in this shop called Unlimited. Very old school tile shop in Whampoa area. Your contractor/ID should know them. :)

Edited to add - found the website. My ID got my subway tiles here: http://www.unlimite.com.sg/

Edited by strikingreality
 

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You can get it in this shop called Unlimited. Very old school tile shop in Whampoa area. Your contractor/ID should know them. :)

Edited to add - found the website. My ID got my subway tiles here: http://www.unlimite.com.sg/

Thanks for the headsup SR :)

Edited by Blooie
 

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