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Is roof terrace of a landed property included in GFA calculation

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Hi,

Would appreciate if anyone can tell me for sure if roof terrace of a landed house is included in GFA calculation. My architect included the roof terrace area as GFA and it push up the GFA of my house.

So now the problem is every builder quote base on GFA, plus minus a bit depends on finishes. I tried to look through the URA handbook but it's mostly for condos/strata units, so couldnt find anything relevant for landed property. Any help is appreciated.

Thanks.

 

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since you have an accessible roof terrace, it will be counted as GFA for contractors since they will need to build an actual floor as opposed to just a simple roof. costing wise is very different from building a roof and a roof terrace.

with a simple roof, one can get away with just using some simple steel columns and beams to build a lightweight roof. but with a roof terrace, the structure needs to be constructed like an actual floor since you will be accessing it for your normal usage.

so your architect is not wrong to put that in as GFA since the contractor would need to based on how much floor they need to construct to quote you.

the condo/strata definitions are more for URA to control the allowable GFA in a development as well as to charge DC to developers.

 

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Hi Snoozee,

Thanks for reply. Actually I was referring to the outdoor terrace area at the attic, not an additional floor. It is outdoor, unsheltered. Initially when I talk to other architect/contractor, they told me the outdoor terrace at attic is not covered so usually psf price is based on built in area only. 

 

 

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You referring to the balcony/roof terrace at attic level or the roof terrace ABOVE the attic? 

If it’s the former, then my architect did not count this as GFA.

if your concern is about construction cost, then I can tell you contractors are not stupid. Even if this is not classified as GFA, the area will still be factored in their quotation.

 

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I am referring to the former i.e terrace at the attic. Yes I agree it shouldn't be in the GFA, your architecture did the right thing.

I just went through the tender exercise, what I can say is the feeling I get is all the builders are not just looking at individual items. All came back very high and at about the same price. So they are all looking at the GFA and pricing the tender that way. The individual items varies so much across builders but yet final tender price can get within +-50k. So if you are not careful about how you mark your GFA you are just giving them a chance to mark it up. Thats the feeling I get.

 

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from my understanding, individual items price varies because the prices are just "randomly" allocated. as long as the final amount is that required amount, the individual items costing isn't that accurate.

can share the amounts you gotten from the various contractors? i'll be doing my tender soon so curious to know what is the current rates

 

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So for my case, adding in the built in space (covered area) and the attic terrace, the builders are all asking for 350psf . This excludes ID work and carpentry.

Translating to your gfa i.e excluding terrace area, it will be 380-390 psf.

 

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Your finishing all high end ones? :D

anyway as mentioned, contractors will base their quote on how much construction needs to be done. The GFA number doesn’t really matter. 

 

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If tender quotes are very tight, it can only mean trouble.

The tender process is rigged.

The tender specs are too lacking in details for any contractor to quote accurately. 

To mitigate the situation, get contractors seperately to quote, not those recommended by the guy calling the tender. 

Insist on NSC for piling, plumbing, electrical, aircon, sanitaryware and tiles. This will surely freak out those non serious  quotes. With detailed breakdowns, u can then accurately compare quotes. 

Insist on a performance bond of 10%. Financially Weak contractors cant afford them. 

 

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NSC I think refer to Nominated Sub-Contract.

basically owner can source for own contractors to do some work instead of letting the main contractor to do all the work. however my understanding is that the main contractor will still charge the owner a percentage fee based on the amount of payment to the nominated sub-contractor as "attendance" fees. so even if the nominated sub-contractor's fees are lower, after adding in the "attendance" fee for the main contractor, the savings may or may not be there.

 

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