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Check out what I posted in the link above bro..

You need to talk specifics with your builder.

Type of pump, salt or sand filters, positions of lights, kill switches, power supply etc etc..

Do check out how to build a pool videos on youtube.. care to share your rough location? Maybe via pm? 

Edited by petetherock
 

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Thanks a lot, Petetherock!

I will follow up with my builder with these specifics. My location is at Serangoon. Building the pool at the backyard as there is a slight constraint.😅 our space has encroached on my neighbour land on the side where I wanted the pool initially. We felt the neighbour may know of encroachment as they might have purposely align their land such that they missed the electric pole at the backyard. So the pole is on my land 😆 and we gain about 100sqft. 

 

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9 minutes ago, Snowcapper said:

Thanks a lot, Petetherock!

I will follow up with my builder with these specifics. My location is at Serangoon. Building the pool at the backyard as there is a slight constraint.😅 our space has encroached on my neighbour land on the side where I wanted the pool initially. We felt the neighbour may know of encroachment as they might have purposely align their land such that they missed the electric pole at the backyard. So the pole is on my land 😆 and we gain about 100sqft. 

if you feel your land has been encroached on, can always get a surveyor to perform the survey and if there is indeed an encroachment, you can send a legal letter to your neighbour to remove the encroachment.

how the land is divided up is up to the authority and not the owners of the land. previously many houses have backyards which are back lanes and have lamp posts, electrical posts, drains running through these back lanes. I think the authorities decided to divide these back lanes to the houses quite some time back (I might be wrong) and hence some houses ended up having these public infrastructures within their land lot. some house owners who are lucky can extend their houses so that their boundary is at the new area. There are also cases where the back lanes are used for public walkway and no one could extend the houses as this would mean cutting off access to the public walkway.

as mentioned, a proper land survey would reveal whether an encroachment has happened or not so if you haven't done so, do go and get one performed. the survey won't cost much (less than 2k) but at least you would know where your land boundaries actually are.

 

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Yes we have done the survey. And found that our land has encroached into theirs.

Our architect said that my neighbour’s house is relatively new so chances of a rebuild is fairly remote.

But I don’t want to risk building the pool on the side where we have a slice of their land. So putting the pool at a less risky place.

 

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11 minutes ago, Snowcapper said:

Yes we have done the survey. And found that our land has encroached into theirs.

Our architect said that my neighbour’s house is relatively new so chances of a rebuild is fairly remote.

But I don’t want to risk building the pool on the side where we have a slice of their land. So putting the pool at a less risky place.

since there is encroachment by your side, then it would be better to take this opportunity to rectify this by putting your boundary wall where it should be. else if your neighbour decides to do something to the house or it is sold later on, it would be much more troublesome for your to fix this issue.

 

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So you are encroaching onto theirs ?

its best to avoid building something on such disputed land until the survey is done..

your build should be able to give solid advice on the size, shape, depth and need for permits etc 

how many skimmers, bottom suctioning, ladders and steps - places to sit and do a little jacuzzi for example

also consider a counter current system and avoid trees so you don’t end up cleaning and clogging up the pumps

start considering the pool tile and styles too and any water features Eg a fountain or slide 

 

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Ya, the “disputed” land is really a headache. We bought the house and did the topo. Then found out we got an extra slice. The trouble is they were there before us and they were the one who did the boundary wall. Unless their own topo guys made a mistake. 


My new neighbour seem very much into fengshui. So I really wonder whether they purposely left that slice out to keep that electric post from their plot and sacrifice their own land. 

so now, we just keep that area for greenery. I will speak to our architect again on this matter.

thanks!

 

 

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1 hour ago, petetherock said:

So you are encroaching onto theirs ?

its best to avoid building something on such disputed land until the survey is done..

your build should be able to give solid advice on the size, shape, depth and need for permits etc 

how many skimmers, bottom suctioning, ladders and steps - places to sit and do a little jacuzzi for example

also consider a counter current system and avoid trees so you don’t end up cleaning and clogging up the pumps

start considering the pool tile and styles too and any water features Eg a fountain or slide 

Thanks for all the tips!! Helps to keep things in check. 

 

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1 hour ago, Snowcapper said:

Ya, the “disputed” land is really a headache. We bought the house and did the topo. Then found out we got an extra slice. The trouble is they were there before us and they were the one who did the boundary wall. Unless their own topo guys made a mistake. 


My new neighbour seem very much into fengshui. So I really wonder whether they purposely left that slice out to keep that electric post from their plot and sacrifice their own land. 

so now, we just keep that area for greenery. I will speak to our architect again on this matter.

thanks!

 

yes, they can build their boundary wall smaller than what their actual boundary is. but it doesn't automatically give the rights to that piece of land to you.

last time (and even now in some cases), two adjacent houses are built with a common party wall in between them so the developer would save costs on building 2 sets of walls/fence. so when one house is redeveloped, the existing house would end up using the new house's party wall as their boundary wall as well. when the existing house is redeveloped, the owner would usually build a new party wall on their side and this new wall abuts the neighbour's wall.

so for your case, I think you should just build a wall/fence to demarcate your own boundary at the part where the neighbour left out. if the electrical pole ended up in "no man's land" then so be it. at least you know that you are not encroaching on your neighbour's land by using it. If SP decides to access the electrical pole for maintenance, then they would be disturbing your neighbour instead of you since the pole is on their land and not yours. the worst case is if your neighbour one day decides that you are encroaching on their land with a garden and sends you a lawyer letter demanding for rental/fees over the years you have used the land. Not sure if it happened before in Singapore but I read an article online of something similar happening in USA recently.

 

 
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30 minutes ago, snoozee said:

yes, they can build their boundary wall smaller than what their actual boundary is. but it doesn't automatically give the rights to that piece of land to you.

last time (and even now in some cases), two adjacent houses are built with a common party wall in between them so the developer would save costs on building 2 sets of walls/fence. so when one house is redeveloped, the existing house would end up using the new house's party wall as their boundary wall as well. when the existing house is redeveloped, the owner would usually build a new party wall on their side and this new wall abuts the neighbour's wall.

so for your case, I think you should just build a wall/fence to demarcate your own boundary at the part where the neighbour left out. if the electrical pole ended up in "no man's land" then so be it. at least you know that you are not encroaching on your neighbour's land by using it. If SP decides to access the electrical pole for maintenance, then they would be disturbing your neighbour instead of you since the pole is on their land and not yours. the worst case is if your neighbour one day decides that you are encroaching on their land with a garden and sends you a lawyer letter demanding for rental/fees over the years you have used the land. Not sure if it happened before in Singapore but I read an article online of something similar happening in USA recently.

 

Yes! I was worried about rental fee 😆 that’s a very good point. Thanks for the idea about having a fence to demarcate the boundary line. 

 

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On 11/23/2020 at 8:31 PM, Snowcapper said:

Thanks for all the tips!! Helps to keep things in check. 

If you have photos or diagrams of your land and the suggested pool construct, do show it.

 

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@Landednewbie 

Do check the dimensions of the pool - there should be a height, wide as well as length - 2 measurements doesn't make sense. 

Do note that if it's deeper than 1.2m, you'll need some permit, your builder should know this.

There are many companies supplying parts, most are ok, it's the aftersales that makes the difference, and your builder is responsible for that.  

I maintain my own pool, but you can expect to pay 70$ a visit for cleaning and chlorine. I choose to do it myself as a form of exercise and save...

For a 12m pool, get at least 3-4 underwater lights. Bright ones are better. 

You should check out counter-current systems, it's like a treadmill. 

Get quality parts for the M&E bits, if the valves break, they will cost $$ to repair. I had to replace some parts because I was trying to save initially. 

I had a ladder as well as stairs to allow easy entry, make allowance for a fence if you have kids.

Avoid trees so leaves don't fall into the water ... good luck!

 

 

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