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Are You Allowed To Hack Wall When Doing Reno After Top?

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Need some help here.

Are you allowed to hack walls during renovation after TOP of a private property? I have heard conflicting views on this.

Some says can, as long as approval is given by the management office on legitimate hacking, while others says that legally, cannot hack anything that is on plan until statutory completion (which is 1 year after TOP).

Would appreciate if those who has renovated their new private property after TOP could comment. Thank you.

 

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Legally (between buyer and BCA), cannot hack anything until CSC, which is not 1 yr after TOP, but is WITHIN 1 yr from TOP. Can be as fast as 2 months after TOP.

(Between buyer and developer) Hack wall may cause damage to your property, or your neighbours, which will void everyone's warranty during the defect liability period. For example, during hacking, neighbour false ceiling crack, claim warranty, main con says is due to vibration from hacking downstairs, neighbour claim contractor, contractor claim u.

Communual areas may get damaged... even if mgt office gives the ok, it does not mean that warranty is not voided. If u willing to underwrite the risks, everything can be done.

 

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That's interesting. Does that mean any kind of reno during the period may void warranty, even if it does not involve demolition of walls? Eg. redoing of bathrooms which may involve changing tiles (ie hacking of old ones), replacement of bathtub, etc.

Although I must say it's a remote possibility, because most people pay big bucks for the designer fittings they see in the sales brochures.

 

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If the originally provided tiles are say.. $4psf.. and the new owner decides to redo with a $6 psf tile. After redoing, there is water leak. Would it be reasonable to demand that the original main contractor to redo the water proofing and then do back with the $6psf tile under a warranty claim? It's not just the $$, the sourcing of the new tile is also an issue.

In the first place, the developer/contractor/mgt office will not even want to agree to allow major renovations during the warranty period unless there is some underwriting of risks. The same also applies to cars. If a heavily modded car is involved in an accident, the insurance company will only fix back to stock, not to the modded status.

Minor reno that does not involve the use of a breaker is not an issue for new developments.

 

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So it looks like anyone getting their keys to a newly completed private property upon TOP will have to do either of the following:

1) undertake all risks during defect liability period and do the renovation one-time to the specification of your liking; or

2) do non-major renovation (ie. does not involves hacking and massive wet works), move in and after the defect liability period, do a 2nd reno.

The 2nd option will be troublesome as you are already living in the apartment and will be greatly inconvenienced.

 

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If wanna change the original floorplan, can always request for developer not to build that wall there in the first place, or to leave the toilets bare, provided the construction has not reached that stage yet.

 

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The third option is much better: Enjoy the new house without renovation.

Many new condos come with "designer" furnishings, some even come with kitchen sets and appliances from Italy, Germany, etc.

I've mentioned before, renovation is a huge drag, it costs a lot of cash (can't use CPF), takes a lot of time (to search for tiles, fittings, etc., review designs, supervise, etc) and involves a lot of risk (bad ID, lousy contractor, defects, etc).

To me, the no 1 rule is to buy a 100%-move in house whenever possible, even if it costs a premium.

So it looks like anyone getting their keys to a newly completed private property upon TOP will have to do either of the following:

1) undertake all risks during defect liability period and do the renovation one-time to the specification of your liking; or

2) do non-major renovation (ie. does not involves hacking and massive wet works), move in and after the defect liability period, do a 2nd reno.

The 2nd option will be troublesome as you are already living in the apartment and will be greatly inconvenienced.

 

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The same also applies to cars. If a heavily modded car is involved in an accident, the insurance company will only fix back to stock, not to the modded status.

A car's warranty will be voided if heavily modded - In fact some manufacturer do not even allow comestic mods !

I guess for basic reno without major 'structura;' changes, warranty shd still apply. But these days most units come fully 'loaded' and hence not much requirement to do heavy hacking/changes.

My friend actually agreed with the developer to hack one wall when he moved in - so I guess it is possible but u will need to get agreement from developer.

 

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If wanna change the original floorplan, can always request for developer not to build that wall there in the first place, or to leave the toilets bare, provided the construction has not reached that stage yet.

Are we allowed to request change the original floor plan from the developer?

 

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Are we allowed to request change the original floor plan from the developer?

Put it this way.. is not an uncommon practice. Ask yr lawyer about this. Developer may or may not agree. Most important.. everything must be in black and white.

 

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just sharing some experience from my friend, who bought a studio at The Metz during the launch, he got his lawyer to write a letter requesting the developer not to erect the wall in the bedroom and it was agreed.

but I think most developer will agree if u take things out from the original floorplan and not adding things

 

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I have this problem

1. Piling works on developement next caused tiles to crack.

2. Contractor uindertake to 'Make Good'

3. Attempt to 'Make Good' MADE WORSE (wrong tile used, more cracked tiles, appliances/cabinets damaged)

Now at a lost whether to allow 2nd attempt to make good (dun hack, overlay).

Fear

a) Make even worse

b) Cabinets/appliances have more damage (can get compensation?)

c) Going through another round of cleaning/dust/noise

d) Tiles pop later

e) After overlay less floor area?

f) Kenn sabo (stuff things or throw pebbles into pipes, etc)

Lawyer advice- get PE to assess then decide next steps.

 

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