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nini

Kitchen Without Wall Tiles?

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my id just suggested to plaster the kitchen wall and paint with outdoor paint (easier to maintain, washable), instead of doing wall tiles, he said can save up 1k++ and this is the new trend as more than 80% of his clients r doing the kitchen wall in this way.. still considering.. whats the pro & cons? Edited by nini
 

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Hi,

My ID give the same suggestion, for us, mainly cost saving ...

i have not decide.

mk

ya me too, $ is one of the concern...

and also found that this is the new trend for modern looking kitchen, u may change the paint color anytime for a new look

hmm... i m fine with the suggestion, but hubby cldnt accept the idea still... (got to brain-wash him a bit maybe ;) )

 

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ya me too, $ is one of the concern...

and also found that this is the new trend for modern looking kitchen, u may change the paint color anytime for a new look

hmm... i m fine with the suggestion, but hubby cldnt accept the idea still... (got to brain-wash him a bit maybe ;) )

Hi Nini,

I also has performed the same to save cost but my painter has mentioned that dun think that the paint will last like what is showcase in the TV. After several wash and tear the paint might experience peeling and oil stains are stubborn and difficult to clean unless light cooking and no cooking at all this will work.

Now thinking of backsplash or steel backing as an alternative. Tiles will work for the long run as they will last for a long time....but this up to individual and this is just my opinion...

Hope this advices help.

Cheers

 

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In my opinion, I think you'll save a lot without the tiles but for maintenance wise, I would consider backsplash. So instead of coming out with extra cash for tiles that's also going to be put up behind the cabinet or backsplash, might consider investing in good, attractive backsplash! I mean tiles outside of the common toilet is pretty redundant right? How often do we wash the walls of yr kitchen?

 

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I've decided on the no tile walls for kitchen too... :)

will be hacking the old tiles then cement screed them and paint over...

thot of plastering over then paint instead of hacking, but realise

the old unit have a number of hollow tiles...might as well hack rather than

face cracked walls in future... :unsure:

from what i gather for me the difference in doing tiles and no tiles

is negligible coz im putting up glass backsplash between my cabinets...

cost of which is almost just as much... :P

oh yah, perhaps its best to paint using those washable surface. :paint: If so, pls avoid Matte paints totally. Once you sponge that area, the matte surfaces gets polished off, leaving a low shiny sheen on the area that was scrubbed. When viewed at diff angles, there will be shiny patches among the matte wall.. Wont be nice yah...

this is particular becoz i take it no one will lay skirting in the kitchen...and for those thinking of washing kitchen mini flood style, may have to take extra care just to avoid splashing water on the walls... Just my POV... :yamseng:

 

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tks guys~ yep, will be doing backsplash, something like this maybe:

renovation-work-installing-of-temper-col

The backsplash are normally of glass materials? I'm wondering if it could withstand the heat from cooking and the hobs. Anyone could advise what type of material to choose for backsplash?

Thanks!

 

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Back splash normaly attached together with the counter top, it raises roughly around 50mm to 80mm at the back of ure kitchen counter top. Normaly the mateirals that ppl use is solid surface, such as LG max or Corian, or some ppl prefer to use granite for kitchen counter top + backsplash.

The one that covers the wall isn't a back spalsh, those are just backing. And there are plenty options on materials tat can be used. Stainless steel, tiles, wall paint, or like that picture shown above. The material is coloured back glass. It will make ure entire kitchen wall looks elegant if u use the correct colours of coz. =)

Tempered coloured glass is quite durable for backing (normally ppl use it for the aesthetic pleasure). However, when it comes to hobs and heavy cooking, maybe try consider using another material such as stainless steel.

Some ppl mix both materials, those that are align with the hob = use stainless steel,

and the rest of the wall area = coloured back glass.

Hope it helps:)

Regards

Edited by stillion77
 

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from what i gather for me the difference in doing tiles and no tiles

is negligible coz im putting up glass backsplash between my cabinets...

cost of which is almost just as much... :P

really? glass backsplash costs as much as wall tiles?

oh yah, perhaps its best to paint using those washable surface. :paint: If so, pls avoid Matte paints totally. Once you sponge that area, the matte surfaces gets polished off, leaving a low shiny sheen on the area that was scrubbed. When viewed at diff angles, there will be shiny patches among the matte wall.. Wont be nice yah...

this is particular becoz i take it no one will lay skirting in the kitchen...and for those thinking of washing kitchen mini flood style, may have to take extra care just to avoid splashing water on the walls... Just my POV... :yamseng:

so what type of paint do u recommend for the kitchen walls that won't have this problem that matt walls suffer???

 

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was told by my id that paint over plastering may have hairline cracks through time. of cos can plaster and repaint.. and this repeats itself.. unless can live with it, he suggests wall tiling..

assuming your id uses good paint instead of cheap paint, this won't be an issue. profit margin for wall tiling is bigger so that may be one of the reasons why he suggested it.

I've decided on the no tile walls for kitchen too... :)

will be hacking the old tiles then cement screed them and paint over...

thot of plastering over then paint instead of hacking, but realise

the old unit have a number of hollow tiles...might as well hack rather than

face cracked walls in future... :unsure:

from what i gather for me the difference in doing tiles and no tiles

is negligible coz im putting up glass backsplash between my cabinets...

cost of which is almost just as much... :P

oh yah, perhaps its best to paint using those washable surface. :paint: If so, pls avoid Matte paints totally. Once you sponge that area, the matte surfaces gets polished off, leaving a low shiny sheen on the area that was scrubbed. When viewed at diff angles, there will be shiny patches among the matte wall.. Wont be nice yah...

this is particular becoz i take it no one will lay skirting in the kitchen...and for those thinking of washing kitchen mini flood style, may have to take extra care just to avoid splashing water on the walls... Just my POV... :yamseng:

it's not necessary to hack the wall tiles even if they are hollow. wall tiles do not face the issue of water accumulation which floor tiles face. this water accumulation is the thing that causes the floor tiles to pop out over time. if your walls crack, it's due to improper sealing or different level of expansion possibly caused by varying material in your wall. or it could just be that your plasterer is unskilled.

my kitchen has no wall tiles, so i laid skirting for the kitchen. when you mop and you have no skirting, your bottom wall will be exposed to more water compared to the rest of your wall.

The backsplash are normally of glass materials? I'm wondering if it could withstand the heat from cooking and the hobs. Anyone could advise what type of material to choose for backsplash?

Thanks!

the backsplash (big one on the wall) can be any material you like, including tile, tempered glass, mirror, acrylic, glass, stainless steel, etc.

tempered glass has no problem withstanding heat from cooking and the hobs. all induction cookers use tempered glass as a cooking surface. but of course, there are varying grades of tempered glass. usually they can withstand temperature of up to 250C.

 

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