Jump to content
Find Professionals    Deals    Get Quotations   Portfolios
Sign in to follow this  
Topline

Replacing roof

Recommended Posts

Hi, any idea how much it costs to replace the roof of a semi d? Current is old sloping roof.

Also, I was told if I replace the roof, I cannot increase the height .... so still have to be sloping. True?

Would it amount to reconstruction? Can someone pls explain what impact it would be if a project is considered reconstruction vs A&A in terms of costs? How much more costs would I have to pay if a particular change to the house causes everything to be considered reconstruction.

Thanks,

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join 46,923 satisfied homeowners who used renotalk quotation service to find interior designers. Get an estimated quotation

so long as your roof works does not end up with you having an additional storey (be it from 2 storey to 3 storey or 2 storey to 2 storey plus attic), it will still be classified as A&A.

reconstruction and A&A fees to URA differs by $3210. A&A is $3210, reconstruction/rebuilt is $6420

other costs are really what you intend to do for your house.

the classification between A&A and reconstruction is more of what extent of work is being done to your house and what needs to be submitted to authorities for approval.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Snoozee. So the difference due to classification as reconstruction is $3210. Which is not that bad, considering the total cost of the project. Not sure why some builders go like, oh no no... like that it becomes reconstruction... as if the costs will really rocket up. Does the approval from authorities take a longer time.... maybe that’s why they want to avoid classifying as reconstruction.

And actually, is there a benefit to reclassifying as reconstruction - can I now fall under envelope control and extend the attic to reach the max height permitted for such houses?

Any idea if I still have to keep my new roof sloping?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

approvals can take 1 to 2 months as each agency has their own timeline to work on the approvals. usually they will take almost their allowed time to reply you. if first time don't approve, you wait again after resubmission. eg: URA takes 1 month to reply. if need to resubmit, you then wait another month. so quite a bit of wait time. also, there is more paper work as more submissions and later on inspections (if needed). I may be wrong but A&A normally don't even need to submit hence not much paperwork and so on compared to recon or rebuilt. if bank loans are involved, then the payment could be longer as banks will hold a retention sum and only release if after CSC. so basically cash flow is locked for contractors.

with reconstruction, you can do more things. you should be able to change the roof profile with reconstruction. not sure about A&A though. but do note that you will need to get a PE for this as structural changes would need PE to design.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, what can one do in rebuilding a house that you cannot do if you just do a reconstruction? What are the restrictions for reconstruction?  Understand the cost is about 30% more for rebuild.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reconstruction requires the retention of a certain percentage of existing structure. A rebuilt means you can start afresh and not be constrained with any existing structure which needs to be retained for reconstruction 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at new roof options... I have been told metal roofs are common now. They are lighter. But I'm concerned about durability (eg rust). Aesthetics is also not great. Also does rainfall sound louder compared to a tiled roof?

Any one has any idea ... which roof options require least maintenance and is more cost efficient in the long run?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Topline said:

Looking at new roof options... I have been told metal roofs are common now. They are lighter. But I'm concerned about durability (eg rust). Aesthetics is also not great. Also does rainfall sound louder compared to a tiled roof?

Any one has any idea ... which roof options require least maintenance and is more cost efficient in the long run?

i'm using metal roof (Lysaght Klip_Lok system) for my main roof and car porch roof. roof has been installed for more than 1 year and so far no signs of rust (touchwood)

no problems with sound or heat unless you are just installing with just a single piece of metal sheet as the roof. my metal roof is installed with multiple layers, metal roofing sheet, bitumen sheet, Zinc sheet, rockwool insulation, aluminium foil, wiremesh. another layer of plasterboard is installed inside the house as ceiling. for car porch, calcium silicate boards are used as the ceiling.

I guess any roof system which is done properly should last at least 10 to 20 years without much maintenance. The things you need to decide are what kind of roof profile you want so that the proper type of roofing material can be chosen. metal roof should be able to be done for any type of roof profile. but if you prefer clay tiles, I think you need to do pitched roof else the water run off would pose a problem with clay tiles on flat roofs. another type of roofing material is aluminium composite panels (like public sheltered walkway) but due to the size of the panels, you will end up with a lot of joints which may not look as nice or seamless.

do note that even for flat roofs, the roof should be done at a slight angle to direct the water run off somewhere. this is to prevent water ponding from occurring on "perfectly flat" roofs. also NEA does not allow for roof gutters to be installed anymore on new developments as gutters may get choked and cause mosquito breeding. as such, all roof water run off should be channeled properly as well in the design.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Snoozee. Did you consider the tiled roof option before deciding on metal? Was tiled roof more expensive? i found this pic online, which seems to suggest this is metal roofing. Looks like a compromise if so.

 

I find tiled roof nicer looking but the slope means i got to compromise on ceiling height inside. But can i decide how much to slope?

metal-roofing-1.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Topline said:

Thanks Snoozee. Did you consider the tiled roof option before deciding on metal? Was tiled roof more expensive? i found this pic online, which seems to suggest this is metal roofing. Looks like a compromise if so.

 

I find tiled roof nicer looking but the slope means i got to compromise on ceiling height inside. But can i decide how much to slope?

metal-roofing-1.jpg

your photo seems to be sheet metal roof stamped to look like tiles.

my house is designed to try to maximise the attic as much as possible based on the envelope control which can be only achieved by having a flat root so clay roofing tiles was never considered.

I think there's some formula for calculating the runoff and required slope. Also different roof materials would require different amount of slope. if you look around existing houses, normally clay tiled roof would have pitched roofs. these are also older houses. those newer ones with flat roofs would usually have metal roofs.

from information gleaned online, it does suggest that interlocking clay tiles should have a slope of about 20 degrees depending on location and length of roof. assuming that your building depth is 20m and the top of the roof is at halfway point (10m), at a slope of 20 degrees, there would be a drop of about 3.64m from the apex of the roof to the bottom.

of cos you can always choose to install at a lower gradient than specified/recommended but whether the supplier/manufacturer would honour the warranty in this case would be another question.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snoozee, is your metal 

On 1/11/2021 at 10:39 AM, snoozee said:

do note that even for flat roofs, the roof should be done at a slight angle to direct the water run off somewhere. this is to prevent water ponding from occurring on "perfectly flat" roofs. also NEA does not allow for roof gutters to be installed anymore on new developments as gutters may get choked and cause mosquito breeding. as such, all roof water run off should be channeled properly as well in the design.

So where would roof water go to? Straight down the tip of the roof? For houses with open balcony on their top floors... means there will be a waterfall "feature" down onto the balcony. Hmmm...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Topline said:

Snoozee, is your metal 

So where would roof water go to? Straight down the tip of the roof? For houses with open balcony on their top floors... means there will be a waterfall "feature" down onto the balcony. Hmmm...

If there is a roof terrace, then there would be rain water down pipes to drain the water down from the open terrace/ balcony. 
the roof water channeling is up the the design of the architect. If no design means free fall off the edge of the roof. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Free fall will prob lead to staining of the tiles on the ground floor? Oh dear... how to avoid? Build a drain right below the edge of the roof to capture the rainfall probably... not very nice to see a drain in the garden area though.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Topline said:

Free fall will prob lead to staining of the tiles on the ground floor? Oh dear... how to avoid? Build a drain right below the edge of the roof to capture the rainfall probably... not very nice to see a drain in the garden area though.

staining is unlikely to happen if you maintain your floor regularly. you will need to have drains within your house to channel the surface water out into the public drains. best is talk to an architect on how to design the roof for water drainage

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Topline said:

Free fall will prob lead to staining of the tiles on the ground floor? Oh dear... how to avoid? Build a drain right below the edge of the roof to capture the rainfall probably... not very nice to see a drain in the garden area though.

It is rather rare for there to have any stains. Typically there are stains only if the water travels over a large distance of roof, or a ledge with insufficient gradient and accumulates a lot of dirt/dust before it hits the floor or wall.

Otherwise typically with metal roofs or tiled roofs, there shouldn't be such an issue. Metal roofs typically require 3-4 degree gradients, while tiled roofs require 15-20 degrees (The modern flat clay tiles require less gradient versus the more traditional arched tiles).

Even if you have a balcony, it doesn't necessary mean that the water will flow from the roof into it. It depends on how you design the roof profile. If staining the tiles is a concern, you can choose to slope the roof away from where the balconies are at.

As for aesthetics of the roof finish, it is entirely possible to design the house such that the roof is not even visible in the first place 😄, so doesnt matter whether it is metal or clay tiles. In this case, metal is cheaper, more durable and more light weight.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

Aura Sink download renotalk renovation guide


×