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How Many Viewings Did You Go Before You Decided To Buy The Unit?

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Just wondering, if you have already exercised the OTP for re-sale, then you discovered some defects in the house that was not told to you by the owner or owner's agent, do you have a right to call the deal off and get back the deposit? In this case, the owners knows about the defect but did not offer this piece of information. Defect will require major overhaul on buyer's part.

 

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Just wondering, if you have already exercised the OTP for re-sale, then you discovered some defects in the house that was not told to you by the owner or owner's agent, do you have a right to call the deal off and get back the deposit? In this case, the owners knows about the defect but did not offer this piece of information. Defect will require major overhaul on buyer's part.

Unfortunately, no. There is no way to back out of an executed OTP, but you still have the option not to complete the purchase. Having said so, I will caution that you must not seek this option without consulting with your lawyer.

What kind of defects? If the defects are really defects, and they are really costly to rectify, then consult your lawyer for the solution.

Good luck!

Edited by Lauer
 

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Just wondering, if you have already exercised the OTP for re-sale, then you discovered some defects in the house that was not told to you by the owner or owner's agent, do you have a right to call the deal off and get back the deposit? In this case, the owners knows about the defect but did not offer this piece of information. Defect will require major overhaul on buyer's part.

Sad to say, buying homes is a case of 'caveat emptor' - buyer beware. Resale homes are sold in a 'as-is' condition. Buyers are expected to do due diligence during their viewings and to ask all pertinent questions before signing on the dotted line. In addition, the home owner and its agent(s) do not owe you a duty of care to show all the home defects. However, you may like to consult your lawyer further on this. Good luck!

Edited by 3Dyms
 

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Sad to say, buying homes is a case of 'caveat emptor' - buyer beware. Resale homes are sold in a 'as-is' condition. Buyers are expected to do due diligence during their viewings and to ask all pertinent questions before signing on the dotted line. In addition, the home owner and its agent(s) do not owe you a duty of care to show all the home defects. However, you may like to consult your lawyer further on this. Good luck!

is it true that after first appointment, HDB will do an inspection on the flat to ensure that seller did not do any illegal change of structure and ensure everything is in order before proceeding to complete the transaction? So the buyer at least knows the unit is safe, and there is no structural problems?

 

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Sad to say, buying homes is a case of 'caveat emptor' - buyer beware. Resale homes are sold in a 'as-is' condition. Buyers are expected to do due diligence during their viewings and to ask all pertinent questions before signing on the dotted line. In addition, the home owner and its agent(s) do not owe you a duty of care to show all the home defects. However, you may like to consult your lawyer further on this. Good luck!

Yes. Therefore, before exercising the OTP, I will advise a buyer to bring an ID or an architect to look at the condo (or HDB) or landed respectively, with the specific objective of identifying any possible defects.

But what is a defect?

In construction-speak, a defect is not the same as workmanship. A defect refers to a piece of construction item that is not properly built. For example:

- A dry wall that rainwater seeps is a defect; a dry wall without this problem but plastered unevenly is a workmanship,

- A wet floor that doesn't channels water to the floor-trap properly is a defect,

- A leaking water-piping is a defect; when embedded in the wall as in condo, it can be costly to fix, sometime involving dismantling of cabinet,

- A leaking bathroom is obviously a defect (send the ID to your downstairs neighbor to enquire if water leaks down to his unit),

- A smelly bathroom is a defect, because of the sewage pipes routing. This is almost impossible to fix for HDB or condo because the piping is also involving your neighbors,

- A poorly constructed balcony door that allows rainwater to seep in, is a defect.

.....

When a purchase is completed, money has changed hands, there is practically nothing one can do to seek compensation for the defects (except where the purchase is a new flat from a developer).

As mentioned, before the completion of a purchase, a buyer is still able to seek compensation from the seller with the identified defects. It is a question of how much defects, and if they are costly to rectify. The lawyer can advise the buyer what to do.

Cheers!

Edited by Lauer
 

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is it true that after first appointment, HDB will do an inspection on the flat to ensure that seller did not do any illegal change of structure and ensure everything is in order before proceeding to complete the transaction? So the buyer at least knows the unit is safe, and there is no structural problems?

Yes on the illegal change of structure.

HDB officer will check item like spalling concrete, illegal reno , window not standard, broken Louvred windows, etc..

All the listed item, the seller need to fix it before 2nd appointment can proceed. This fix cost is paid by seller not buyer.

If the seller ask u to pay, ask him to fly kite, report to HDB.

http://askhdb.hdb.gov.sg/Themes/HDB/Answer_internal_authorized.aspx?MesId=7710186&IntNotes=1&reAskpage=answer_int_authorized.aspx&RecordQuestion=yes

  • Q:
  • I have submitted my resale application to HDB. When will I be informed of the date/time of the resale inspection?

    [selling Your Flat > Sellers Are Required To > Ensure Renovations Are Authorised and Permitted]

  • A:
  • Upon registration of a resale application, HDB Resale Office will send a letter to inform both buyers and sellers of:

    • the scheduled resale first appointment date
    • the date/time of the resale inspection for the resale flat. This inspection is carry out by the HDB Branch
 
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Yes on the illegal change of structure.

HDB officer will check item like spalling concrete, illegal reno , window not standard, broken Louvred windows, etc..

All the listed item, the seller need to fix it before 2nd appointment can proceed. This fix cost is paid by seller not buyer.

If the seller ask u to pay, ask him to fly kite, report to HDB.

http://askhdb.hdb.gov.sg/Themes/HDB/Answer_internal_authorized.aspx?MesId=7710186&IntNotes=1&reAskpage=answer_int_authorized.aspx&RecordQuestion=yes

  • Q:
  • I have submitted my resale application to HDB. When will I be informed of the date/time of the resale inspection?

    [selling Your Flat > Sellers Are Required To > Ensure Renovations Are Authorised and Permitted]

  • A:
  • Upon registration of a resale application, HDB Resale Office will send a letter to inform both buyers and sellers of:

    • the scheduled resale first appointment date
    • the date/time of the resale inspection for the resale flat. This inspection is carry out by the HDB Branch

thanks!

 

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My unit was the 3rd I saw but didn't get back til about 2 months later. Guess no one wanted it at the asking price except us. Haha...

I believe on fate when finding the place you call home. It's a warm and safe and comfortable feeling when you step into the house. We got that feel with our house though it has no view...

Edited by pills
 

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i view 11units and one of which I view twice, but hand is slow and was sold before I could counter offer. Settled on the 11th unit and exercise the OTP on the spot. I spend 20 mins viewing the flat.

Extremly comfy with the hse although it was a mid flr. This is what I called fated :) And we are the 1st couple to view the flat.

All previous 10 units I saw is high floor - btw 8th flr to 12 flr.

 

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Usually how many times do you view the flat? Do you engage FS master to view after first viewing? Some friends told me i have to view once in the day and once in the night, but does the seller allow view so many times?

 

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If you're a sincere buyer, they'll allow.

And if you're not interested in the flat in the daytime, I don't even think you'll want to view it at night.

I viewed mine 3 times, the last time before I sign the OTP.

 

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Usually how many times do you view the flat? Do you engage FS master to view after first viewing? Some friends told me i have to view once in the day and once in the night, but does the seller allow view so many times?

He binzz. If a seller is serious about selling his or her flat they will allow you to view it unhindered, as many times as you feel is necessary to come to your decision – of course it should be suitable to both your schedules! Once my wife and I found our favourite flat, after about seeing 7 or 8 'no goes', we went back about 3 or 4 times before we confirmed with the seller’s agent that yes, we would by it. We also did a night time viewing as well, however this happened to be the same night that we handed over the deposit cheque J I agree with ‘pills’ though – unless you’re really interested in the flat then I don’t think there’s much difference in viewing at night or day with the possible exception of at day time you get to see more view! At the end of the day, you keep viewing that flat until you decide either yes or no! Happy viewing!
 

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Why i ask this question is because, i thought if view many times, seller thinks you want the house very much and mark up on the COV? Not all sellers are honest and nice sellers..

 

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Why i ask this question is because, i thought if view many times, seller thinks you want the house very much and mark up on the COV? Not all sellers are honest and nice sellers..

COV is subjective and there is no limit to it. One have to practice prudence when proceeding.

If you deem the COV is unacceptable, you can choose to walk away from it.

For eg, an EA, big area of 140m2 up,high floor, corner unit, next to Jurong point, unblock view, child care downstairs, most windows facing the neighborhood park, seller can ask for 120k COV. As long as seller can wait, there is no hurry for him to sell. If he is hard press for cash for his next purchase, he may just ask for 80k COV to let go and can be bargain lower especially if you can take over immediately.

Then again, if you are not willing to part with 80k COV, then you have to skip the unit then.

Viewing multiple times indicate you are keen on the unit but does not means seller can increases COV.

If seller does so, simply walk away then.

 

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